Meal #4: pork tenderloin extravaganza part 1

We buy a lot of pork tenderloin, because it is one of the best cuts of meat money can buy … and it’s so amazingly cheap. We bought a bunch when they were on sale for about $2.50/lb. $2.50! A pound! That’s just crazy!

Why is pork tenderloin so amazing? As with all tenderloin, it is extraordinarily tender, forgiving when cooked, and extremely lean for such a tender cut of meat. Normally I don’t buy meat unless it has gorgeous marbling, but with tenderloin, I know I don’t need the fat for juiciness, tenderness or taste.

Furthermore, it’s pork. And I’m Chinese. Apparently, in Chinese, when someone says ‘meat’, they mean ‘pork’ unless otherwise specified. I don’t know why Americans don’t like to eat pork, but I guess it means that I can get my preferred meat really cheaply. Thanks, Americans! (Now, why doesn’t this logic work for lamb?)

So anyway, because we buy so much tenderloin, we occasionally have trouble figuring out what to do with it. After struggling with several ideas, all of which were either unexciting or impractical, Hide said ‘trust me’. 20 minutes later, dinner was on the table.

Tenderloin extravaganza, part 1

It tasted better than it looked; Hide said he still needs to work on his technique. Basically, what he did was slice up the tenderloin, dip it in a mustard mixture, cover it in panko, and pan-fry it. The procedure is very similar to our croquettes, except the inside is just a simple slice of tenderloin instead of minced shrimp or fish.

Instead of providing step-by-step instructions, I’m just going to throw up some pictures of the process. Maybe we’ll post step-by-step instructions once Hide has perfected the technique.

Sliced into steaks

Sliced into steaks

Dipped in mustard mixture and panko (notice Hide's pro two-hand method for preventing ogre hands).

Dipped in mustard mixture and panko (notice Hide’s pro two-hand method for preventing ogre hands, learned from Alton Brown).

Pan-fry in wok (this is where the technique needs improvement).

Pan-fry in wok (this is where the technique needs improvement).

Oh, and as a side, I made a sweet and sour cabbage using apple cider vinegar and sugar (and the leftover cabbage from Meal #1). It was okay, not great. I’ll have to work on my execution.

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Food, Food Stamp Challenge and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Meal #4: pork tenderloin extravaganza part 1

  1. Pingback: Week 1 Wrap-up | extra curricula

  2. Pingback: Meal #11: Tonkatsu | extra curricula

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s